Thursday, August 10, 2017


My latest design, Boston Flip, is a hat design created in a soft, natural chunky yarn.  It features a bold motif, and is otherwise a simple knit, meant to be done twice, with the colors flipped.


These hats were designed as a gift to my daughter Maya and her best friend Olivia.  In a few weeks they will both be off to different colleges, and as a mom and a knitter there was really only one way to properly send them off.  

I of course, have tons to say and impart to the girls and can only do that by overthinking every single element of the design, right? 




I started with the yarn. Traditional. A soft wool, in gorgeous natural colors from a company that respects the farms and breeds of Yorkshire.  Baa ram ewe's Dovestone Chunky was perfect, and Maya smelled it the moment I got home from Pomfest with these skeins.  They know the role of the sheepy yarn.  It's important.

And the feel of the design?  Still traditional, but not. Strong and bold and unique. Both of these guys have always swam a little upstream, out of the current - and often right into it.  Both girls love their history and tradition and are unafraid to challenge it, think about it and decide how it should be re-interpreted for a changing world. Hence a bold, strong motif that felt traditional but was actually not pulled off an existing chart. It's perhaps Icelandic, but perhaps not.   



And in the motif are layers.  A sturdy bottom arch that maybe even looks like a house. I think this one represents the stuff we've added to each child as parents - the rules, the lessons, the patience (or not), years of arguing and teaching and living with them. Showing them what we could as they grew up - that's the foundation we've created. The second arch is still sturdy and fits right into that bottom one - that's all the stuff they've done themselves - the friends they chose, the music and the writing and the schoolwork, the adventures they had and the things they've experienced and the people they've changed and been changed by so far. 

Then, there's that top portion - the taller, open arch.  That's the future.  It  has solid walls and a roof, but there's room inside for whatever comes next, and it's held up by those bottom layers. 



So yep, I overthought everything.  But it still feels right, and even thought it's a complex backstory, it's a simple hat.  Nice thick yarn, some fun stranded colorwork and a simple crown.

Two skeins (130 yds each) will get you two S or M hats, each the reverse of the other.  If knitting two in the largest size, you may want some extra yarn. I have included notes in the pattern about how to modify for depth or width - as well as ideas on using a worsted or bulky gauge.  Here you can see I've knit the white one to be just a little slouchier than the brown version. I think it works both ways..

The pattern is available on Ravelry HERE for $6.50, and is on the patterns section of this website as well, just click PATTERNS on the bar at top.... 

The drink?



Well the "flip" part is pretty self explanatory, right?  White with brown, brown with white.

But the Boston part is because that's where these two have wandered around for the past 7 or 8 years.  Somerville, Cambridge, JP, Boston, North Shore, Arlington, Winchester, and Lexington. Parks and museums and the T and the city and the suburbs. It seemed appropriate.

A flip is s smooth, creamy drink - it's a small, sweet way to end the night, and it involves an egg. That's what adds the creaminess, so it's first shaken without ice, then ice is added before you pour.

In a shaker without ice:

2 oz maderia
2 oz bourbon
1 fresh egg (both yolk and white)
.5 simple syrup

shake without ice until frothy, add ice to shaker, shake again briefly and pour into coupe glass. Add nutmeg.


2 comments:

Christine said...

I love everything about this hat...the yarn combined with this pattern and the thought that went into each stitch. What a lovely gift to your daughter and her friend.

Nursecathy said...

What a beautiful post. And beautiful hats. And beautiful young women. I might have gotten a little teary eyed here. Thank you.